Night Vision vs. Full Spectrum

You may have heard the term ‘full spectrum’ with regard to ghost hunting cameras and video much the last few years. But you’ve had your night vision camera by your side for many years and don’t see a need to switch up. It gets a good picture and that’s all that matters, right. Well, sort of.

What is the difference? Let’s talk about what night vision is…

Night vision, in basic terms, means it sees infrared light (or IR). If you have a camera from years ago with ‘night vision’ or ‘night shot’ it may have a small infrared light on the from of it that allows you to see a few feet in the dark. You may not even see the IR light on the front because it’s invisible to the naked eye. Night vision is cool. It allows you to see in total darkness. But what are you actually seeing? Answer: infrared. That’s it. Only infrared. Most off-the-shelf infrared cams filter out all light so that it can focus on the IR light. So that’s all your getting. It’s akin to putting blinders on a horse. Though it gives you a way to see IR int he dark, it removes the ability to see other light. You do not actually see (most) visible light or ultraviolet. Heck, some night vision cameras even use such a short band of IR that you’re only seeing just a small portion of IR. Yeah, it can get confusing. But, with this, we can suffice to say that IR is very limited in your ability to document light anomalies on an investigation.

Enter: Full Spectrum

Now on to full spectrum. In simple terms, full spectrum refers to the concept of being able to see more than we can see with our naked eye. This means being able to see visible light, infrared and ultraviolet. On one end of the spectrum is Infrared (or IR). On the other side we have Ultraviolet (UV). Cameras can be modified through adjusting or removing filters to see deeper into either end of the spectrum. This conversion, allowing us to see deeper into both IR and UV, is referred to as Full Spectrum.

Camcorder-DXG-FullSpectrum-View4There are different methodologies as to what constitutes good Full Spectrum. In some cases the filter is removed entirely thus allowing all light in. Other methods involve replacing the filter with something that will see IR and UV but filter out visible. I consider the latter (where visible light is blocked) as a multi-spectrum modification, not Full Spectrum. As the term suggests, while you are allowing light outside of visible in, it is not a full spectrum if you’re filling out any potential existing light. It’s like taking off a horse’s blinders so he can see better only to replace them with another pair that blinds differently. Hope that makes sense. I like analogies. While this method may be practical for daylight uses where bright visible light can overpower the IR and UV this is not an issue when conducting low light paranormal investigations in the dark. Since ghost hunting and paranormal investigating is typically done in the dark, you need all the light you can get.

Flexibility of Full Spectrum

Here’s my favorite parts of using a full spectrum camera: you can use any light. Since a night vision camera cuts out anything other than IR the only light source you can use with that type of camera is infrared. That’s it.

With full spectrum, it sees (just about) everything. So, if you want to be covert and use infrared only. Go for it. If you want to use a bright white light. Pop it on. You’ll blind all your fellow investigators and they may unfriend you on Facebook, but it would work. Use an ultraviolet light. It’ll work too. But if you want to take full advantage of a full spectrum cam, use a light that has a full range of infrared, ultraviolet and visible light. One that switches between IR only and full spectrum is perfect so you can use what you need as you need it without swapping out lights.

Sure, there is much more to the science of light and the spectrum in which it resides. But I hope this helps illustrate what the difference is between night vision and full spectrum and how full spectrum is a far better solution for your investigations.

 

Here are a few helpful videos.

 

 

 

 

 

Jason Sullivan of Midwest Haunts takes a look at the hardest question in paranormal investigations…What is a Ghost? Is there really an answer or is it an unanswerable question…you be the judge.

Ghosts caught on camera - orbsThere is a huge debate amongst the skeptics and the paranormal enthusiast. Can orbs be caught on camera or are orbs actually ghosts. There has been proof that orbs that show on pictures can be nothing more than dust, air borne pollen, or bugs.

The invention of the digital camera have really introduced this into the forefront. The flash has been found to have a reaction to dust, air borne pollen and even bugs. When the picture is analyzed they appear on the picture as orbs. Read the rest of this entry

ghost hunting kitsYour ghost hunting kit can be as cheap or as expensive as your budget can bear. However, the real key is not how much you spend – it is only spending the money on items that you have a real plan of how to use.

There is a variety or analog and electronic equipment to detect or record ghostly haunting, sounds or other paranormal happenings, but you don’t have to have all of the equipment possible when you start, and, in fact, it is probably best to start you ghost hunting kit with the basics and add additional equipment after you master the equipment you already own. Read the rest of this entry

EVP Recorder - Ghost Recorder An EVP recorder is really nothing more than a standard audio recorder (digital or analog) that is used in the course of a Paranormal investigation to capture an Electronic voice phenomena.

You can use pretty much anything that will capture audio for EVP recording, you are limited only by your budget and your technical knowledge. Read the rest of this entry

 Page 1 of 2  1  2 »